Main Menu
Main Page
Forums
Recent changes
Random page
Help

Databases
GlitchDex
AreaDex
AttackDex
DexDex
ItemDex
StatDex
TMHMDex
TrainerDex
TypeDex
UnownDex
More

Major Glitches
Trainer escape glitch
Old man trick
Celebi Egg trick
Select glitches (Japan)
SRAM glitch
CoolTrainer♀ corruption
LOL glitch
Rival LOL glitch
Super Glitch
ZZAZZ glitch
Pomeg data corruption glitch (Glitzer Popping)
Tweaking
Elite Four door glitch (Japan)
Pokémon merge glitch
Pokémon cloning
Time Capsule exploit
Arbitrary code execution
Coin Case glitches
More

Other Glitch Categories
Glitches by generation
Glitches between two generations
Japan-only/language specific glitches
Music glitches
Natural glitches
Non-core series glitches
Non-Pokémon glitches
Officially acknowledged glitches
Recurring glitches
Dead glitches

References
Pokémon GameShark codes
The Big HEX List
Glitch Pokémon cries
GB programming
Curiosities
Debugging features
Easter eggs
Error traps
Glitch areas
Glitch myths
Non-glitch exploits
Placeholder texts
Pokémon glitch terminology
Unused content and prerelease information

Useful Tools
8F Helper
GBz80 to Items
Old man trick name generator
PATH (Prama's Advanced Tweaking Heaven)
Save file editors
Special stat/Pokémon converter
Trainer escape Trainer Pokémon finder

Affiliates
Legendary Star Blob 2 (Hakuda)
Pokémon Speedruns wiki
PRAMA Initiative
Become an affiliate!

Technical
Site Source Code

Search Wiki

 

Search Forums

 

Author Topic: How exactly does "over-glitching" screw up games permanently? (Or does it?)  (Read 1408 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

OtakuReborn

  • GCLF Member
  • Offline Offline
    • View Profile
Maybe I'm missing something or game boy cartridges aren't organized the way I would have thought, but I would have thought all of the game data (that is, data + instructions) resides on what is effectively a read-only area (ROM, in other words). So it's not possible to write to it under normal circumstances (i.e. not EPROM or EEPROM, and even then, that doesn't make any sense unless it somehow knows how to recreate itself). If I'm not mistaken, the only place you CAN write to is the system memory (in the game boy itself) and the SRAM chip (if it has one, which Pokemon games all have one).

I would think that any glitches you pull off would be corrupting the system memory (which is probably later written to SRAM when you save). All of this is filed under save data, however. If you were to nuke your SRAM (delete the save file), that should take out all of the glitchiness with it, right? Because, if that's the case, I don't understand how, short of physical damage to the chips, you can irreparably kill your game from glitches.

Would anyone care to enlighten me?

Photon-Phoenix

  • Gotta pop dem windows.
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
You can't. The Gameboy cannot write to the ROM and the SRAM, if for some reason is causing crashing on boot, can be completely wiped by taking out the cart battery.  When you take out the battery and reinstall it, it's effectively like starting with a "fresh" cartridge.

OtakuReborn

  • GCLF Member
  • Offline Offline
    • View Profile
Ok, so when people say that it kills their game, this is referring to the save game, I assume. I didn't think it was possible to kill your entire game cartridge like that.

Though I'm still confused on cases where people start new games, but still see glitches.

blahpy

  • Yeah! Pomeg Berry!
  • Member+
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Ok, so when people say that it kills their game, this is referring to the save game, I assume. I didn't think it was possible to kill your entire game cartridge like that.

Though I'm still confused on cases where people start new games, but still see glitches.

It can't edit the game itself, but if you didn't remove the battery and your save is "erased" by a glitch then it won't have been erased fully, hence "shadows" of your previous save can remain

OtakuReborn

  • GCLF Member
  • Offline Offline
    • View Profile
I see.

But that would mean the game's operation requires it to read SRAM even when starting a new game. Why would that be necessary on a new game? I can see that if you're loading an old game, then any glitchiness will be loaded into system memory and continue the glitchiness, but in the case of new games, the SRAM, even if it wasn't clean, should have been ignored.

Then again, I guess it would have to read SRAM to determine whether or not there is a game to load or not. I guess if the glitches corrupted up to that point, then they could carry over. Or if there's something before loading a game that requires save data (maybe there's an order to the pokemon that fly past in the title screen that I don't know about). I'm just guessing at this point.

IIMarckus

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Impersonal Text
    • View Profile
    • iimarck.us
But that would mean the game's operation requires it to read SRAM even when starting a new game. Why would that be necessary on a new game?

More likely that the “clear SRAM” code doesn’t actually clear all accessible SRAM. But I haven’t looked at this in detail.